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Help Needed With Wedding Gift

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What is an appropriate wedding gift for us to give to a couple we do not know?

We have just been invited to a "formal" wedding in Delhi for the daughter of the Chairman of a large company. We do not know the family of the bride or the groom. We are good friends with the Senior Manager of the company, who extended the invitation to us because he knows we’re fascinated by Indian wedding customs.

Besides adding formal clothes to our already packed and full suitcases, we now have to figure out what to get for a wedding gift that is small enough to be packable, that is unbreakable, that we can get through customs, and that we can proudly give to the couple.

Any suggestions, from the amount we should spend in USD to what type of gift, would be appreciated. We understand something for the house would be appropriate - but we have no idea what - perhaps a decorative item made in our home state would be good...?

distaff half of hfot2

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The first idea that popped into my mind turns out to be too expensive: a silver "Revere" bowl by Tiffany: classically American, made by a company with an internationally recognized name and social "cachet." Even though the Revere bowls are too pricey, the Tiffany name stuck and I came up with this idea -- not unbreakable but should be fine in your carry-on or even in checked baggage if well packed and well padded (e.g., by burying in the middle of your clothing): a pair of very simple Tiffany crystal candlesticks (of course, wrapped in the iconic blue Tiffany box) - $55 each so a pair would run you $110:

http://www.tiffany.com/shopping/item.aspx?...nu=3&page=5

I'm not sure what kind of decorative item from your home state (Vermont?) you had in mind, but I think you run the risk of it seeming "too rustic" to the Chairman's daughter ... HOWEVER, Simon Pearce is in Vermont and he makes beautiful stuff http://www.simonpearce.com/CSTM_Home.aspx

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Wedding gift.... In my experience most Indians love to get money. I don't like to give money as a gift, as a present.

I will always try to find a real personnal gift, something about a hobby you have in common, something as a remembrance, something to give you strength. Just a personnal something.

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Silver items in India will be much cheaper, and they will appreciate the trouble you took. Go to any local jeweller with an Indian! For rich people, cash gift may be tacky. Lord O Lord, I am answering Ladies questions!

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The first idea that popped into my mind turns out to be too expensive: a silver "Revere" bowl by Tiffany: classically American...

I'm not sure what kind of decorative item from your home state (Vermont?) you had in mind, but I think you run the risk of it seeming "too rustic" to the Chairman's daughter ...

Thanks for the suggestions.

Rustic is not all there is to Vermont. [Why, we even have flush toilets now]

Tiffany is a good idea but it seems a little tame for the occasion we anticipate.

Here's what we've been thinking about: a very heavy blown glass multi-colour "showpiece" by Michael Egan, a Vermont artist. See the link below for some of his work [the things we are looking at are not photo'ed in his gallery pages, however]

http://www.glassartists.org/Gal19987_Michael_Egan.asp

His work is shown at Frog Hollow Gallery which has many very non-rustic art objects from Vermont.

distaff half of hfot2

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Here's what we've been thinking about: a very heavy blown glass multi-colour "showpiece" by Michael Egan, a Vermont artist. See the link below for some of his work [the things we are looking at are not photo'ed in his gallery pages, however]

http://www.glassartists.org/Gal19987_Michael_Egan.asp

His work is shown at Frog Hollow Gallery which has many very non-rustic art objects from Vermont.

distaff half of hfot2

But they must be filled with maple syrup, aren't they? God forbid it should spill on the Chairman's daughter!

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Here's what we've been thinking about: a very heavy blown glass multi-colour "showpiece" by Michael Egan, a Vermont artist. See the link below for some of his work [the things we are looking at are not photo'ed in his gallery pages, however]

http://www.glassartists.org/Gal19987_Michael_Egan.asp

Very nice, I SO approve. One of those vases would be a tasteful and contemporary choice.

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Thanks for the suggestions.

Rustic is not all there is to Vermont. [Why, we even have flush toilets now]

Yes, I know that. After all, I'm aware of Simon Pearce (see above) and I'm even aware of this website: http://www.vermontcrafts.com/index.html

But let's face it, Bennington pottery and maple syrup (yes, Somerset ;) ) are probably the first things that spring to mind when you think about things "made in Vermont" (OK, Ben & Jerry's, too ... but that won't travel well, unfortunately - otherwise, it would surely be a big hit ^_^ ).

Tiffany is a good idea but it seems a little tame for the occasion we anticipate.

But the tameness and "good taste" of Tiffany might be a plus if you don't know the taste and style of the bride and groom!

Here's what we've been thinking about: a very heavy blown glass multi-colour "showpiece" by Michael Egan, a Vermont artist. See the link below for some of his work [the things we are looking at are not photo'ed in his gallery pages, however]

http://www.glassartists.org/Gal19987_Michael_Egan.asp

His work is shown at Frog Hollow Gallery which has many very non-rustic art objects from Vermont.

Very nice!

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Guest priya

Wow, there are some really beautiful vases displayed and any of them would make a wonderful gift. However, have you thought of a table lamp? That would be rather nice too.

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