Jump to content


Photo

Mithai


  • Please log in to reply
153 replies to this topic

#1 Sneha

Sneha

    Frequent Flyer

  • Contributors
  • PipPip
  • 155 posts

Posted 07 October 2003 - 10:39 AM

For this Diwali I decided to make Kaju Katli at home.

1 kg. cashews soaked for a few hours in water
600 gms sugar
2 tbsp. ghee
1 tsp. cardamom powder

Drain and grind cashews to a fine paste using  as little water as possible.

In a thick non stick pan cook on low heat the paste and sugar.
Keep on stirring till the mixture starts leaving the sides and then add ghee and cardamom powder and mix well.

Spread on a oiled worksurface and roll lightly with a rolling pin, to 1/8" thickness. Apply silver foil, cool and cut into diamond shaped katlis.

Next time I am going to try the same method with Almonds.

#2 Suresh Hinduja

Suresh Hinduja

    Suresh Hinduja

  • Super Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,237 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bangalore - INDIA
  • Interests:food innovation
    golf
    single malt
    author
    consulting chef

Posted 10 October 2003 - 11:31 AM

Hi Sneha,
Thanks for the Kaju Katli, I am sure that there are many here who would like to replicate it.

Breaking away from tradition, try using 25% roasted Cashewnuts, I think you'll like the results.

If you follow this unsolicited advice, do let me know of the outcome.

I fry by the heat of my pans
http://www.gourmetindia.com

My Photos

chicken 2014
Album: My Pixels
474 images
80 comments


#3 Sneha

Sneha

    Frequent Flyer

  • Contributors
  • PipPip
  • 155 posts

Posted 18 October 2003 - 10:39 AM

Dear CEO,
I had some slivered almonds which I dry roasted and added on top of the Kaju Katli before it set. The contrast looks much better than the plain white original and the almonds add a new dimension to the mithai. I must confess that I freak out on roasted almonds as in Chocolates.

Thanks for improving my Kaju Katli.

#4 Sneha

Sneha

    Frequent Flyer

  • Contributors
  • PipPip
  • 155 posts

Posted 11 September 2004 - 11:51 PM

Diwali will be coming up soon again, any ideas for making mithai at home?

#5 Suresh Hinduja

Suresh Hinduja

    Suresh Hinduja

  • Super Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,237 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bangalore - INDIA
  • Interests:food innovation
    golf
    single malt
    author
    consulting chef

Posted 13 September 2004 - 06:16 PM

:( Perhaps this will help you decide. :(
Posted Image

I fry by the heat of my pans
http://www.gourmetindia.com

My Photos

chicken 2014
Album: My Pixels
474 images
80 comments


#6 Sneha

Sneha

    Frequent Flyer

  • Contributors
  • PipPip
  • 155 posts

Posted 14 September 2004 - 02:23 PM

Oh Great!
Now you have confused me even more. :(

What is a Pantua, Malbo, Darbesh and Mihidana. I must confess I have never heard of these mithais.Or maybe I knaow them but you all call them by different names in Bangalore.   :(

#7 Suresh Hinduja

Suresh Hinduja

    Suresh Hinduja

  • Super Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,237 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bangalore - INDIA
  • Interests:food innovation
    golf
    single malt
    author
    consulting chef

Posted 29 October 2005 - 09:54 AM

A selection of Mithais available in the shops here.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

I fry by the heat of my pans
http://www.gourmetindia.com

My Photos

chicken 2014
Album: My Pixels
474 images
80 comments


#8 Sneha

Sneha

    Frequent Flyer

  • Contributors
  • PipPip
  • 155 posts

Posted 31 October 2005 - 01:13 PM

Seeing these pictures maybe I should cancel my request to friends and relatives not to send mithais for Diwali.   :(
I've never seen a strawberry mithai before, looks great.   :P

#9 Suresh Hinduja

Suresh Hinduja

    Suresh Hinduja

  • Super Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,237 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bangalore - INDIA
  • Interests:food innovation
    golf
    single malt
    author
    consulting chef

Posted 02 November 2005 - 03:25 PM

Okay I admit, I had to give away most of the 10 kgs carrots(5th image) which I got at @ Rs. 2 per kg.
I did however make 2 kgs into Gajar Halwa

2 kgs grated carrots cooked with 1 litre milk, sugar and freshly ground cardamom powder till milk is absorbed. I chucked in a kewra leaf also. Switch off the heat and add a dollop of ghee.
Posted Image

Serve with roasted slivered almonds on top, this way they remain crisp and provide an interesting contrast to the mush of cooked carrots.
Posted Image

I fry by the heat of my pans
http://www.gourmetindia.com

My Photos

chicken 2014
Album: My Pixels
474 images
80 comments


#10 Unicorn

Unicorn

    Newbie

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 37 posts

Posted 06 November 2005 - 10:26 AM

Suresh..I'm like Pavlov's dog......and your pictorial posts are my bell....I start salivating even before I scroll down to your posts!

#11 Ash

Ash

    Member

  • Contributors
  • PipPip
  • 81 posts

Posted 14 November 2005 - 01:58 PM

Serve with roasted slivered almonds on top, this way they remain crisp and provide an interesting contrast to the mush of cooked carrots.
Posted Image

DROOL, DROOL!   :)

#12 vkn

vkn
  • Member
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Musct, Oman
  • Interests:Traditional Indian home cooking

Posted 01 January 2006 - 02:05 PM

Fantastic results Suresh.  

Here is how we made Sandesh at our home yesterday for the new year's eve.
VK Narayanan
Chef de cuisine
My Dhaba - http://mydhaba.blogspot.com

#13 Suresh Hinduja

Suresh Hinduja

    Suresh Hinduja

  • Super Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,237 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bangalore - INDIA
  • Interests:food innovation
    golf
    single malt
    author
    consulting chef

Posted 04 January 2006 - 12:07 PM

Tis the season for Nolen Gur Sandesh   :)

Posted Image

I fry by the heat of my pans
http://www.gourmetindia.com

My Photos

chicken 2014
Album: My Pixels
474 images
80 comments


#14 Peppertrail

Peppertrail

    Author

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 282 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Texas
  • Interests:Travel, Reading, international cuisine, food history and food writing.

Posted 04 January 2006 - 08:25 PM

Tis the season for Nolen Gur Sandesh

Gur - aka jaggery   :D
What is nolen gur? Please explain for the language challenged :)

#15 Suresh Hinduja

Suresh Hinduja

    Suresh Hinduja

  • Super Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,237 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bangalore - INDIA
  • Interests:food innovation
    golf
    single malt
    author
    consulting chef

Posted 04 January 2006 - 09:31 PM

Nolen Gur = Date Palm jaggery. Gautam could you elaborate on this, please?

I fry by the heat of my pans
http://www.gourmetindia.com

My Photos

chicken 2014
Album: My Pixels
474 images
80 comments


#16 vkn

vkn
  • Member
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Musct, Oman
  • Interests:Traditional Indian home cooking

Posted 07 January 2006 - 12:42 AM

We made Chocolate Idlee today.  Has anyone tasted this before?
VK Narayanan
Chef de cuisine
My Dhaba - http://mydhaba.blogspot.com

#17 Tez Dhar

Tez Dhar
  • Member
  • 29 posts
  • Location:Mumbai

Posted 10 January 2006 - 11:44 PM

Ive been scarfing down vast quantities of Gajak. Apparently it can be be made only in dry cold weather. I can identify til and gur as it's constituents, dont know what else goes into it.

#18 Chef Raj

Chef Raj

    Frequent Flyer

  • Contributors
  • PipPip
  • 137 posts

Posted 12 January 2006 - 05:23 AM

Ive been scarfing down vast quantities of Gajak. Apparently it can be be made only in dry cold weather. I can identify til and gur as it's constituents, dont know what else goes into it.

You are right it can be made only in this season and becomes powdery in very little time. It is made by continous stirring GUr and Til paste over low heat for a very long time.

#19 SAUCY

SAUCY

    Guru Member

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,682 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bombay - India
  • Interests:Money, Food, Wine and Women - what else is there ?

Posted 12 January 2006 - 09:51 PM

Tez - one of my favourites, I can eat a kilo at a time, I like the Gajak balls :P
" There is no love sincerer than the love of food " - G B Shaw

http://saucyrecipes.blogspot.com/

#20 Gautam

Gautam

    Guru Member

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 13 January 2006 - 06:21 AM

Ammini,

Sorry for the delay. Nolen gur is the liquid golden syrup produced by boiling down the sap or neera tapped from a specially prepared wound tissue near the growing tipof the wild or sugar date palm, Phoenix sylvestris.

The first taps of the season, usually mid to late november in central Bengal,  are usedto make this Nolen gur. A reasonable approximation may be had by substituting a mix of light and dark grades of maple syrup, at least as far as sandesh flavor is concerned. Maple sugar also provides  you with an inkling of the taste  of this palm gur.