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Pomfret Biryani

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#1 phodni

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 08:05 PM

For Bague...

Sorry for the delay. While we are on the biryani/pulao/CKP subject, here is my Gran's pomphret pulao recipe. Few flavors that tend to rule CKP cooking are garlic (loads of it), coconut milk and tamarind (not used in this recipe). This pulao ends up very delicately flavored and spiced and absolutely delicious. Hope you enjoy!

1. Fish substitutes can be Surmai (sub: king fish) or Rahu. Best with Pomphret (sub: Pompano) though...

2. I tend to use 1.25 cups of rice to a pound of meat now. Use this ratio at your own discretion. rice to liquid ratio is 1:2.

3. This recipe is for 1.5 kg of fish (apologies for being all over the place with measuring units). Marinade for an hour with haldi, laal mirchi to taste (remember this will be the heat required for fish and rice), 2 tsp ginger, 2tsp garlic, 2 tsp dhania pdr, salt.

4. In a coffee grinder make a powder of 15 green elaichis and 3 tsp shah jeera. Reserve.

5. Chop lengthwise 4-5 med sized onions and brown. Reserve.

6. After marinating time is done clean fish of excess marinade (reserve the marinade. removing the excess marinade from fish surface allows the fish to brown a bit instead of boiling in the marinade) and lightly fry. Do not fully cook. Remove fish and reserve.

7. In the same bartan, fry the excess marinade and add 1/2 cup coconut milk + water combination+ salt enough to cook the rice (rice water combo is 1:2. Do not overdo the coconut milk - a light flavor is what is needed). Bring to boil.

8. In a separate bartan lightly bhuno the rice (soaked for 30 mins) in ghee, cloves and cinnamon. Cook rice in the liquid prepared in (7) above. Once cooked, spread on a tray and let rice cool.

Assembly.

9. In a thick bottom pan spread ghee with fingers and line the bottom with tej patta.

10. 1st layer is rice, sprinkle the browned onions over the rice and a few pieces of fish. Sprinkle generous portion of the masala prepared in step 4 over the fish pieces. Repeat.

11. Cover rice with a moist cheese cloth. Close with tightly fitting lid and give dum for approx 15 mins till the pulao begins to steam.

12. Careful while serving - try and keep the fish pieces whole (my grandmother used to judge the quality of the pulao depending on flavor and whether the fish steaks ended up on the plate whole...


Enjoy!

Edited by phodni, 17 February 2008 - 11:56 PM.


#2 Sekhar

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 08:16 PM

Pomphret/Pomfret has always been my favorite fish. And what Hyderabadi doesn't perk up (especially when recovering from a bout of flu) when there is a mention of Biryani?! :rolleyes: ;)

This is a must try!

Thanks!

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#3 phodni

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 10:15 PM

Hope you like it. Make sure that you get the fish steaks cut a little thick so that they don't disintegrate while cooking...

#4 bague25

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 01:49 PM

Phodni

Thanks for this recipe - I've got pomfrets in the freezer so I'll try this soon and report here...
"Tell me what you eat, I'll tell you who you are" - Jean Anthelme BRILLAT-SAVARIN

#5 Shama

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 10:47 PM

Wow, being a CKP, I shall definitely try this one. I must say, I miss all the typical CKP food as I now live in U.K.
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#6 Suresh Hinduja

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 02:38 PM

Shama, welcome to your first post here! Do tell us more about yourself. :o

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#7 Gautam

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 01:14 AM

A warm welcome, Shamaji. Have you discovered the bangladeshi fish vendors of UK, re: Pomfret? Their name for it is roopchaanda.

#8 Shama

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 10:38 PM

Hello everyone,

I live in a leafy village in Surrey, U.K and I teach Indian cooking to anyone who wishes to learn how to cook Indian food. Have a look at my website. It is www.properteam.co.uk I had a lesson today and it was for 'Indian Takeaway'. I taught 3 men and 2 women how to cook Onion bhajis, Tandoori chicken, Chicken tikka masala, chicken jaalfreizi, lamb bhuna, lamb rogan josh, tarka daal, pilau rice and chapaatis. Phew!!!!!!!!! I am tired now and relaxing in front of the computer reading about.........food. I am obsessed with it. Yes, I have bought pomfrets in U.K. The frozen ones. My sister-in-law sometimes goes to Billingsgate market to buy her Indian fish. But you have to be there before 5am. Maybe one day........
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#9 Sekhar

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 10:56 PM

Lamb Bhuna...

With the sadly poor quality of lamb/goat we get here, some of our mutton recipes have been adapted to pork after we moved here. Specially the dry fry/bhuna variety. You got to pick the right cut though.. :o

As Heraclitus say:

Nothing endures but change.
and adapt too.

:o

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#10 Shama

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 11:03 PM

I used a mixture of shoulder and leg of lamb. The fat in the shoulder makes sure that the meat is still moist and the meat from the leg.....Well purely healthy reasons!!!! The end result is nice thick gravy.
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#11 Suresh Hinduja

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 11:17 PM

Hello everyone,

I live in a leafy village in Surrey, U.K and I teach Indian cooking to anyone who wishes to learn how to cook Indian food. Have a look at my website. It is www.properteam.co.uk I had a lesson today and it was for 'Indian Takeaway'. I taught 3 men and 2 women how to cook Onion bhajis, Tandoori chicken, Chicken tikka masala, chicken jaalfreizi, lamb bhuna, lamb rogan josh, tarka daal, pilau rice and chapaatis. Phew!!!!!!!!! I am tired now and relaxing in front of the computer reading about.........food. I am obsessed with it. Yes, I have bought pomfrets in U.K. The frozen ones. My sister-in-law sometimes goes to Billingsgate market to buy her Indian fish. But you have to be there before 5am. Maybe one day........


You must be tired.
It's bhuna hard day's night. :o

I fry by the heat of my pans
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#12 Sekhar

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 11:25 PM

I used a mixture of shoulder and leg of lamb. The fat in the shoulder makes sure that the meat is still moist and the meat from the leg.....Well purely healthy reasons!!!! The end result is nice thick gravy.


We try to get shoulder meat, popularly -'baby goat', same goat. only the shoulder is different, more expensive.

Popular cuts of pork to adapt:

Pork Butt (not butt, but : http://www.virtualwe...ct.html#defined the othe off end really.)

Pork Tenderloin

And sometimes pork chops with some marbling.

Sometimes the cheapest cuts are the best! http://www.gourmetin...tyle_emoticons/default/laugh.gif

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