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Indian food rich in good cholestrol (hdl) ?


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#1 VSL

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Posted 25 April 2003 - 02:49 AM

I know...its a different topic than others. sorry...
I would like to know which Indian vegetable / fish is high in omega 3 fatty acids - the fat that increases the good cholestrol i.e HDL.
I dont think avocado is available in India?
Unfortunately, we Indians have one of the highest rate of heart problems in the world and hence this topic. I dont have heart problem but I did have low HDL and high LDL. Is it our genes or is it Indian food????
thanks
vsl

#2 Hemant

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Posted 25 April 2003 - 08:04 PM

Hi VSL, I suggest you do something about it in a hurry. Visit a doc. Take LDL lowering tablets.

To increase good HDL, exercise a bit every day. Drink alcohol in moderation. The good effects of fish are limited to two portions a week. Eating more does not help.

To reduce LDL, lose weight. I would go to a professional dietician to get the correct diet, this issue is too serious for you to do it casually.

Good luck.

#3 Suresh Hinduja

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Posted 25 April 2003 - 11:15 PM

Not all fish contain omega 3 oils. Salmon, Mackerel, Tuna, Herring, Sardines and Trout are some that have Omega 3.

Green leaf vegetables are also recommended.

Other sources are Omega 3 fortified eggs available in India as Diet eggs.

Hemant's advice is spot on too.

Above all avoid stress and do what makes you feel happy except the obvious no-nos.

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#4 Guest_VSL_*

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Posted 26 April 2003 - 12:32 AM

hi hemant and ceo,
thanks for the replies and concern.
1. i am on meds for the last 3 yrs. my overall cholestrol is down (168) but hdl is still quite down (39) and my triglycerides (300) are quite up. imagine what i was when i started the meds :) . i am not overweight (175 pounds) and i drink moderately 2-3 times a week - either red wine, wheat unfiltered beer or scotch.
2. frankly i did not know Salmon, Mackerel, Tuna, Herring, Sardines and trout are available other than canned. are they?
and ceo - u r right not all fishes/seafood has omega 3. rather shellfish like mussels, clams, crabs and lobsters are not good for people like me though i love 'em all. :)
fyi - whenever i visit India (4 weeks), i am either in delhi or chandigarh and do visit Mumbai for a few days.
thanks again
vsl

#5 Suresh Hinduja

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Posted 29 April 2003 - 11:51 PM

Sorry, I posted these  names as I thought you would find it useful in USA.

Coming to India is a different question all together, in fact many questions, as every part of the country will have local names for the fish.

In apna Bombay we buy them fresh:
Mackerel = Bangda
Salmon = Rawas
Tuna = Surmai
There may be some error here as there are many sub species to a  Fish.

I forget what Sardines and Herrings(not red) are called. Trout should be available in Delhi.

The simplest and most delicious way is to wrap whole fish in foil with a dash of olive oil, herbs and a little wine. Bake in a medium hot oven for about 15-20 minutes and serve sprinkled with Balsamic vinegar.

This being the basic recipe you can now play Chef with various ingredients like saffron, allspice, star anise, ginger.......

Regards

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#6 Madonna

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Posted 02 June 2003 - 08:53 AM

The simplest and most delicious way is to wrap whole fish in foil with a dash of olive oil, herbs and a little wine. Bake in a medium hot oven for about 15-20 minutes and serve sprinkled with Balsamic vinegar.

Worked like a dream! I am going to try the other variations next.
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#7 Chef Raj

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Posted 15 September 2004 - 05:44 PM

There are two schools of thought:
Ghee is good for you
Ghee is bad for you

What do you all think?

#8 Tomato

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Posted 21 September 2004 - 12:37 PM

There are two schools of thought:
Ghee is good for you
Ghee is bad for you

What do you all think?

I'd like to know too. :(
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#9 Sneha

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Posted 23 September 2004 - 09:29 AM

There are two schools of thought:
Ghee is good for you
Ghee is bad for you

What do you all think?

I want to know also. :(

#10 Gautam

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Posted 29 September 2004 - 10:07 PM

My take on cholesterol etc. is that a sedentary
lifestyle, absence of exercise, and a positive energy
balance [eating more than we need] outweigh all other
risk factors in the affluent South Asian diet. There
is no substitute for physical activity which regulates
a number of vital physiological processes, as diverse
as regular bowel movement to the stimulation of the
circulatory system in the soles of our feet, to the
all-important insulin response (to name just a very
few).

Without appropriate physical activity, there is no
sense talking about regulating good health primarily
through diet.  Now activity+diet is wonderful, and
with regular exercise, the need to consume too much or
inappropriate foods is naturally curtailed.  I speak
as a sinner, and not as a saint.

#11 Software Chick

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 01:07 PM

this one says it's good for you
and
also good, coconut oil too
and
bad for you.
So what does it mean?

#12 Sneha

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 10:57 PM

My take on cholesterol etc. is that a sedentary
lifestyle, absence of exercise, and a positive energy
balance [eating more than we need] outweigh all other
risk factors in the affluent South Asian diet. There
is no substitute for physical activity which regulates
a number of vital physiological processes, as diverse
as regular bowel movement to the stimulation of the
circulatory system in the soles of our feet, to the
all-important insulin response (to name just a very
few).

Without appropriate physical activity, there is no
sense talking about regulating good health primarily
through diet.  Now activity+diet is wonderful, and
with regular exercise, the need to consume too much or
inappropriate foods is naturally curtailed.  I speak
as a sinner, and not as a saint.

I guess that sums it up perfectly, first Exercise then ghee.