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maharaj1406007988

Best Way To Learn Hindi?

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[quote name='Indojinguy' post='5746' date='May 25 2006, 04:34 PM']Well, Hindi doesnt 'depend' on gender its just how its grammer works. But I concur it doesnt make sense for beginners for inanimate objects to be a guy or girl object. So to answer your question, figuring out gender in living things is fairly easy, for objects there are no set rules.
Remember the noun itself doesnt tell you gender its the modification of the verb in the sentence that will.
(as well as singular or plural in some cases.)

Here are some examples:
I./
Mein airport say aa ruhi hoon. [I (fem.) am coming from the airport.]
mein - I/myself : sound is that of 'men' without the 'n'.
say - from : sound of 'sa' in 'same'.
aa - coming : 'aa'
ruhi - am : 'ru' (of rug) + he. [Note that since the word ends in 'e' sound, it means its a female that came from the airport.] see post #21: that raha is male, but that sentence is gender free. You know like in English when the gender is unknown it defaults to male... same thing in Hindi.
hoon - past participle of is (hai) : like 'soon', change 'h' for 's', diminishing 'n' in the end.

II./
Mein mandir/ghar/hotel jaa ruhi hoon. [I (fem.) am going to the temple.]
mandir - temple : mon (as in Monday) + dir (as in dirham - the arab currency)
ghar - home : throaty sound of 'gh' as in Ghana + 'ar' of arrest.
jaa - going : ja of jar.
III./
Hum Mumbai jana chahtey hein. [We (gender neutral) want to go to Mumbai.]
Hum - we : Hum of Hummer.
jana - to go : ja (see II in this post) + na.
chahtey - want : 'cha' of chai + 'h' + tay. (cant find a word for this one.) Note that it would be chahti - fem, chahta - male.
hein - plural of 'hoon' : hein as in 'han' of hangover, with a diminishing n.

IV./
Yeh car/gaadi kitney kee hai? [How much is this car for?]
Yeh - this : Yeh, sounds like from 'yay' or nay.
gaadi - vehicle : 'ga' of garden + a + dee
kitney - how much : kit is same as 'kith' of kith and kin + 'neigh' of neighbour.
kee - is : this ends in 'e' - female, kaa - male, kay - plural, gender neutral.
Yes, anyone of more age than yours is 'aap'. Equiageds or younger - 'tum'
If I were you and was not sure the stranger is older or younger, I'll take the safe bet and go for 'aap'.[/quote]

While the examples clearly indicate differences per gender, it looks as though I'll still need to practice it enough to figure out which form to use. It's one thing reading a phrase and knowing which gender the object is, but it's a whole different story when I want to ask the question or speak of an inanimate object (not knowing correct gender). Perhaps keep it gender neutral form?!

Thanks for the tip about aap! At least I won't make any blunders now :(

Q3) How do you know which postpositions (prepositions) to use to describe location? When do you use which? Does it matter?

examples:
1: (in front of) key nazdik, key aagey, key saamney

2: (because of) key karna, key maarey

3: (in the direction of, towards) taraf, aur Edited by fromusawithluv

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Serena, do you know how the German 'ä' is pronounced?
'hai' is pronounced like 'hä' in German.
'ai' is in fact one single sound and is written in Devnagri script as a single letter. The English script is missing some symbols for several Hindi sounds, so a combination of multiple English letters is used to write those alien sounds. This can be quite confusing and ambiguous, therefore I'd recommend to learn the Devnagri script first. It's not as hard as it looks like at first. Just think about that: for learning Hindi, you'll have to memorize thousands of words while the Devnagri script has only some 50 different letters. It's very well worth to invest some hours into learning the script, and belief me, it's also highly rewarding when you finally can read all those signs, filmi adverts, paroles etc. :(

[quote name='maharaj' post='5753' date='May 25 2006, 01:51 PM']I am now straight on the silent "n" on mein. I have seen this written "mai" also.[/quote]
I usually see it transliterated as 'main' and incidentally it's even pronounced like the French word 'main' (hand). (do you know a bit French? You seem to be Canadian after all..)
The 'n' is not exactly silent, but the 'ain' is one single sound. The 'n' means that the 'ai' has to be pronounced as a nasalized sound.
Again, the transliteration can be quite ambiguous (if you don't know the word already, you can't know if the 'n' has to be an 'n' or if it marks nasalization), so if you really want to learn Hindi, please learn the Devnagri script first. Edited by dani

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[quote name='fromusawithluv' post='6098' date='May 28 2006, 05:17 AM']Q3) How do you know which postpositions (prepositions) to use to describe location? When do you use which? Does it matter?

examples:
1: (in front of) key nazdik, key aagey, key saamney

2: (because of) key karna, key maarey

3: (in the direction of, towards) taraf, aur[/quote]
Oh thats easy... all prepositions will use 'kay'. I've put a list of some below...
just a note, the 'because of' 'key' can have a variation... its mostly 'key' as in your examples.. but there is one exception that ocmes to my mind at this moment...
'kee wajah say' - 'Because of the reason' or 'For the reason'

Example: Tyre puncture kee wajah sey mujhe dare ho gayee. - I'm late because of a flat tyre.
mujhe - form of 'mein', means 'to me' : moo-jay
dare - late/being late : dey-r
ho gayee - happened (2 words) : ho ga-ee

word hindi sound
----- ------ --------
"about," - key aas paas : que aas paas (que as in, que sara sara)
"above," - key uuper : que uu-per
"across," - key paar : que paa-r (paar as in, spar without the 's' in the beginning
"after," - key baad : que baa-dh
"against," - key saath : que saa-t-th (the t in the middle is rounded, if you say it as the usua sharp T as in 'tea' it will mean 60 in Hindi.
"along," - key saath saath :
"among," - key beech : que beach
"around," - same as 'about'.
"at," - pur (no key needed) : pur, as in spur without the 's'.
"before," - key pehley : que peh-lay
"behind," - key peechay : que peechch-ay
"below," - key neechay : que knee-ch-ay
"beneath," - same as 'below'.
"beside," - same as 'against'.
"between," - same as 'among'.
"beyond," - same as 'across'.
"by," - same as 'against'
"down," - same as 'below'.
"during," - key dauran : que dau-raan
"for," - as in 'for the reason' - see the flat tyre example above.
"from," - sey : say (same as say in in English, ex: Say your name.)
"in," - key ander : que un-der (rounded d, not sharp d of 'day'.)
"inside," - same as 'in'.
"into," - same as 'inside'.
"with," - same as 'against'. There is another way to say this - aur : or (same as A 'or' B in English) [this aur is close to 'and' in meaning.]
"within," - same as 'in'.
"without." - key bina : que bin-ah

[quote name='maharaj' post='5753' date='May 25 2006, 01:51 PM']How long did it take you to get this far learning Hindi? It is a second laguage to you, yes?[/quote]
Maharaj: I'm as Indian as one can be. But I've been using Hindi a lot less ... having movied out of India since some years now. So, yes currently Hindi is a second language to me. (English being the first.)


[quote name='dani' post='6122' date='May 28 2006, 09:28 AM']so if you really want to learn Hindi, please learn the Devnagri script first.[/quote]
Thats good piece of advice. Unfortunately, I can't write Hindi anymore... because we dont write in Hindi .... I guess. Many years before I wrote and gave an address in Hindi to a literate rickshah-walla and he said he couldn't understand what I had written.
:(

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[quote name='indojinguy']Thats good piece of advice. Unfortunately, I can't write Hindi anymore... because we dont write in Hindi .... I guess. Many years before I wrote and gave an address in Hindi to a literate rickshah-walla and he said he couldn't understand what I had written.
mellow.gif[/quote]
for someone who doesn't write Hindi, I'm completely in awe! Very impressive :D

thanks for the prepositions and their pronunciations. I should have specified better. I meant, how does one use a "common" preposition? Do key nazdik, key aagey, key saamney all mean the same in a sentence or is one preferred over the other? The same question applies to the other (2) examples I gave. Or am I making this harder on myself??

[quote name='dani']Again, the transliteration can be quite ambiguous (if you don't know the word already, you can't know if the 'n' has to be an 'n' or if it marks nasalization), so if you really want to learn Hindi, please learn the Devnagri script first.[/quote]

for a little bit of devanagari background and extra linguistics, check out this cool [url="http://www.omniglot.com/writing/brahmi.htm"]website[/url]! It's really interesting how languages from all over the world are tied. It truly is a small world..just like that Disney song! :D LOL! Did you know Chai is the same in Hindi as in Greek and in Russian?? (yah..I know..little off topic :)) Edited by fromusawithluv

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[quote name='fromusawithluv' post='6175' date='May 28 2006, 07:56 PM']Do key nazdik, key aagey, key saamney all mean the same in a sentence or is one preferred over the other?[/quote]
their meaning can be similar in specific situations, but they are not exactly synonyms.
'ke nazdik' means 'near of', 'in the vicinity of'
'ke saamane' means 'opposite of'
'ke aage' means 'ahead of', beyond, farther

[quote name='fromusawithluv' post='6175' date='May 28 2006, 07:56 PM']The same question applies to the other (2) examples I gave.[/quote]
for 2) I don't know, never heard those words

for 3) 'ki taraf' means 'in the direction of' (pay attention for the gender here, it has to be 'ki' not 'ke')
There's a nearly similar word with a different meaning: 'ki tarah' means 'like'
what do you mean with 'aur'? I only know that word as 'and', 'additional' or similar

(disclaimer: main bhi Hindi ka expert nahin hum, sirf vidhyarti hum) Edited by dani

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[quote name='dani' post='6122' date='May 28 2006, 01:28 AM']Serena, do you know how the German 'ä' is pronounced?
'hai' is pronounced like 'hä' in German.
'ai' is in fact one single sound and is written in Devnagri script as a single letter. The English script is missing some symbols for several Hindi sounds, so a combination of multiple English letters is used to write those alien sounds. This can be quite confusing and ambiguous, therefore I'd recommend to learn the Devnagri script first. It's not as hard as it looks like at first. Just think about that: for learning Hindi, you'll have to memorize thousands of words while the Devnagri script has only some 50 different letters. It's very well worth to invest some hours into learning the script, and belief me, it's also highly rewarding when you finally can read all those signs, filmi adverts, paroles etc. :D
I usually see it transliterated as 'main' and incidentally it's even pronounced like the French word 'main' (hand). (do you know a bit French? You seem to be Canadian after all..)
The 'n' is not exactly silent, but the 'ain' is one single sound. The 'n' means that the 'ai' has to be pronounced as a nasalized sound.
Again, the transliteration can be quite ambiguous (if you don't know the word already, you can't know if the 'n' has to be an 'n' or if it marks nasalization), so if you really want to learn Hindi, please learn the Devnagri script first.[/quote]

dani,

Aaaaah, the french word for hand....Mais oui. A perfect fit dani...Merci

Indojinguy,

Thank you again. I am cutting and pasting your posts for quick reference. Will print them also.

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[quote name='dani' post='6179' date='May 29 2006, 12:28 AM']their meaning can be similar in specific situations, but they are not exactly synonyms.
'ke nazdik' means 'near of', 'in the vicinity of'
'ke saamane' means 'opposite of'
'ke aage' means 'ahead of', beyond, farther
for 2) I don't know, never heard those words

for 3) 'ki taraf' means 'in the direction of' (pay attention for the gender here, it has to be 'ki' not 'ke')
There's a nearly similar word with a different meaning: 'ki tarah' means 'like'
what do you mean with 'aur'? I only know that word as 'and', 'additional' or similar

(disclaimer: main bhi Hindi ka expert nahin hum, sirf vidhyarti hum)[/quote]

Dani - Thanks for the information..

vidhyarthi muhthlub "student", hey nah? tho accha baath hey. :)

2) (because of) key kaarn, key maarey
probably I did not write them properly..

3)here are some examples of "aur"

a ) keynteen mandir key daayeen aur hey. the canteen is on the right side of the temple
b ) unkee baayeen aur unkee patnee baitee hain. his wife is sitting on his left.

just don't know when to use which! or does it even matter?! Edited by fromusawithluv

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[quote name='fromusawithluv' post='6388' date='May 31 2006, 10:48 AM']3)here are some examples of "aur"

a ) keynteen mandir key daayeen aur hey. the canteen is on the right side of the temple
b ) unkee baayeen aur unkee patnee baitee hain. his wife is sitting on his left.

just don't know when to use which! or does it even matter?![/quote]
Thats is 'oor'. And it is always kee oor.

Canteen mandir kee [left/right] oor hai.
unkee biwi unke [left/right] oor hai.

oor : sound of 'ore' as in Iron-ore.

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um, I'm a bit confused now. We don't talk about 'और', or do we?

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[quote name='dani' post='6540' date='Jun 1 2006, 01:27 PM']um, I'm a bit confused now. We don't talk about 'और', or do we?[/quote]
That is 'aur' - And

the 'oore' is - in the direction of.

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