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maharaj1406007988

Best Way To Learn Hindi?

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[quote name='fromusawithluv' post='5443' date='May 23 2006, 02:27 PM']was waiting for more lessons to follow.... before you posted the link to the Hindi Resources.
Thanks for the link! I especially found the Colordo state uni link quite useful.. has Hindi colloquial information too![/quote]
hmm... I do have a full time job that I must keep. (though sometimes I dont want to ... LOL)

How about you learners (or wanna be learners) tell me phrases/sentences/words in English that you want to be said in Hindi. I will explain those in grammer, translated words and sounds they make etc.
This will also make it practical for you and interactive for me. Not that I want to be paid... but I do want it to be interestful for both you ppl and me.

For instance: A general conversation starter would be 'Hey x/y/z, Hows it going?' which in Hindi will be:

'Aur x/y/z, kaisa chal raha hai?'

[word] - [meaning] : [sound]
Aur - and : awe-r. (awe of, shock and awe.)
kaisa - how : Qai-saa
chal - walk (lit.) : chul (ch, as in Chandigarh)
raha - continuum/goes : ruh-aa
hai - is : h-ay

So, tell me whats next.

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maharaj

you have picture of maharashtra state transport bus, ST as we call it fondly in Bombay, as your avatar. a rattling piece of metal driven insanely by madmen over roads as wide as your seat or as crowded as a peak hour train station.. ....too many trips in these cages, my bones still reverberate if I think about it..., I dont think want to do it anymore if I can avoid it.....

if you are going to learn hindi..dont come anyway near Bombay :unsure:.. Mumbai has its own flavour...influences of marathi, english, immigrant communities and custom words....a very bastardized language without any form or gender....

go north!!

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Indojinguy, thank you for your efforts!
.....but for me is a problem with the pronunciation because I have to read it in english and sometimes I make confusion!

hai=hay (as in "bay"?)

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[quote name='Serena' post='5498' date='May 23 2006, 09:57 PM']Indojinguy, thank you for your efforts!
.....but for me is a problem with the pronunciation because I have to read it in english and sometimes I make confusion!

hai=hay (as in "bay"?)[/quote]
Serena: grazie! (I dont know how to say you're welcome in Italian.) :huh:

The best I can describe the Hindi 'hai' (its not as in bay) is the sound of 'ha' from 'hat'.
The speaking thing will work best over Skype or such voice based chat.

Got to go now, will post another later.

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Wow!
Great suggestion Serena...Lessons. Indijinguy is invaluable, (I.I.) Have taken your links Indo, and they are very good. For me, verbs are helping me immensely. I am also doing well at your SVO stuff. Thanks. I appreciate your help.

Greenchutney,
Very observant of you to connect MH Bus and learning Hindi. Is Nagpur north enough?? I will be there for a while this winter. Most likely not, I suspect.
BTW, what did you step in to make your shoes look like that? :rolleyes:

Maha

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[quote name='Indojinguy' post='5573' date='May 24 2006, 07:40 AM']Serena: grazie! (I dont know how to say you're welcome in Italian.) ;)[/quote]

Prego, si the right word! :D
I have to say grazie to you, I am waiting for the next lesson.
I think that some pronunciation are more similar to italian than enghlish probably B)

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ha!..my muddy shoes from a ramble in the rain near Trimbakeshwar [Nasik, Maharashtra]. what a beautiful country side and in the monsoons...ah! you are making me nostalgic. avoid the town and get out to the countryside...

nagpur..never been there..you really want to be in the northern heartland/plains to immerse in pure hindi..would guess delhi, bhopal, lucknow..anywhere in UP?..othes can correct me here...I personally prefer the Bombay hindi in all its rotten form....but thats just because of my affiliations with the city... the northern or should I say pure hindi just seems too snooty and stuck up for many of the mumbaikers :D

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[quote name='Indojinguy' post='5472' date='May 23 2006, 09:08 PM']hmm... I do have a full time job that I must keep. (though sometimes I dont want to ... LOL)

How about you learners (or wanna be learners) tell me phrases/sentences/words in English that you want to be said in Hindi. I will explain those in grammer, translated words and sounds they make etc.
This will also make it practical for you and interactive for me. Not that I want to be paid... but I do want it to be interestful for both you ppl and me.
<clip>[/quote]


Thank you Indojinguy!! And spending your valuable time away from your work...thanks! :D

Q1) What is the best & easiest way to figure out the gender of the object (temple, car, etc.)? I mean Hindi depends very much on the gender. Just practice/memorize the words? Is there a tip? I think this is the hardest part of learning Hindi for me.

Q2) When do you really use Aap? is it only addressed to "elders"? I see it addressed to strangers, but I am confused if the stranger seems to be younger than me. Would it be considered rude to use Tum for strangers, who seem to be younger than me?

I have more, but I'll just start with these (2) questions.

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[quote name='fromusawithluv' post='5711' date='May 25 2006, 08:23 AM']Q1) What is the best & easiest way to figure out the gender of the object (temple, car, etc.)? I mean Hindi depends very much on the gender. Just practice/memorize the words? Is there a tip? I think this is the hardest part of learning Hindi for me.[/quote]
Well, Hindi doesnt 'depend' on gender its just how its grammer works. But I concur it doesnt make sense for beginners for inanimate objects to be a guy or girl object. So to answer your question, figuring out gender in living things is fairly easy, for objects there are no set rules.
Remember the noun itself doesnt tell you gender its the modification of the verb in the sentence that will.
(as well as singular or plural in some cases.)

Here are some examples:
I./
Mein airport say aa ruhi hoon. [I (fem.) am coming from the airport.]
mein - I/myself : sound is that of 'men' without the 'n'.
say - from : sound of 'sa' in 'same'.
aa - coming : 'aa'
ruhi - am : 'ru' (of rug) + he. [Note that since the word ends in 'e' sound, it means its a female that came from the airport.] see post #21: that raha is male, but that sentence is gender free. You know like in English when the gender is unknown it defaults to male... same thing in Hindi.
hoon - past participle of is (hai) : like 'soon', change 'h' for 's', diminishing 'n' in the end.

II./
Mein mandir/ghar/hotel jaa ruhi hoon. [I (fem.) am going to the temple.]
mandir - temple : mon (as in Monday) + dir (as in dirham - the arab currency)
ghar - home : throaty sound of 'gh' as in Ghana + 'ar' of arrest.
jaa - going : ja of jar.


III./
Hum Mumbai jana chahtey hein. [We (gender neutral) want to go to Mumbai.]
Hum - we : Hum of Hummer.
jana - to go : ja (see II in this post) + na.
chahtey - want : 'cha' of chai + 'h' + tay. (cant find a word for this one.) Note that it would be chahti - fem, chahta - male.
hein - plural of 'hoon' : hein as in 'han' of hangover, with a diminishing n.

IV./
Yeh car/gaadi kitney kee hai? [How much is this car for?]
Yeh - this : Yeh, sounds like from 'yay' or nay.
gaadi - vehicle : 'ga' of garden + a + dee
kitney - how much : kit is same as 'kith' of kith and kin + 'neigh' of neighbour.
kee - is : this ends in 'e' - female, kaa - male, kay - plural, gender neutral.

[quote]Q2) When do you really use Aap? is it only addressed to "elders"? I see it addressed to strangers, but I am confused if the stranger seems to be younger than me. Would it be considered rude to use Tum for strangers, who seem to be younger than me?

I have more, but I'll just start with these (2) questions.[/quote]
Yes, anyone of more age than yours is 'aap'. Equiageds or younger - 'tum'
If I were you and was not sure the stranger is older or younger, I'll take the safe bet and go for 'aap'. Edited by Indojinguy

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Thank you again Indojinguy,

I am now straight on the silent "n" on mein. I have seen this written "mai" also.

How long did it take you to get this far learning Hindi? It is a second laguage to you, yes?

I wonder if these Hindi tips and lessons could be a section on the India Tree? Anyone with helpful info would post. Hmm, I think it would allow you to keep that fulltime job of yours. haha. Your efforts are very much appreciated.

Maha

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