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Suresh Hinduja

Chitpavan

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The example, I gave of a "Durian," I think is like a "skunk" of the tropical fruits, so powerful. I know, places like Singapore, do not allow you to board the buses or public transports carrying durian with you. Some mangos are not that "smelly" and you could get by not refrigerating them. But some in India are very smelly and have a lot of phenolic compounds to irritate your mouth and refrigeration definitely helps, even to eat as "pulp," they call, "Amrus."

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This is such an informative topic, I just had to bump it up.

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Suresh Ji , thanks for bumping this up, Dr Jay's post is informative.

 

thanks to colonists of India, they introduced some awesome non invasive species from S.America into India . Dr BGL Swamy , renowned botanist, has also written kannada book "Namma Hottealli Dakshina america" ( southamerica in our stomach) covering the introduced species, What our ancestors cooked must have been so different from what we cook today.

It is largely true that if sanskrit ayurveda or local medicine texts did not cover that plant ,then it is  introduced species. However , scientifically, Nativity or a Geographical origin of a plant is determined on basis of species diversity in that region, local ecosystem, symbiosis . Ecosystems all over the world are extensively studied and documented. 

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Thanks Musa ji for that info on Dr BGL Swamy. Had to look him up for his book and came across this link in the Hindu.-

http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/mp/2002/04/01/stories/2002040100470100.htm

 

Elsewhere here our member Aminni Ramchandran has researched some old texts which lead us to believe that the Idli was made without rice . 

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Elsewhere here our member Aminni Ramchandran has researched some old texts which lead us to believe that the Idli was made without rice .

 

Intresting , after I read your comment on Idli being made without rice I went through the actual post that Aminni wrote up in the topic .

Quoting a portion of the same below.

 

Recipes from Lokopakara

September 22, 2012

Omission of rice in the recipe for idli, the south Indian breakfast staple, is quite noticeable. This is one of the dishes that evolved over the centuries. According to K.T.Achaya the very first time idli is mentioned in 920 AD in the Vaddaradhane of Sivakotiacharya, a Kannada work. It was considered one of the eighteen dishes a lady should serve her guests. Chavundaraya’s recipe for idli also does not include rice. He also does not mention if it was fried or steam cooked. The earlier idlis were made with urad dal, spices and yogurt water. A century later another Sanskrit work describes iddarika made with similar batter as a fried dish.

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That is interesting , must be true, food is all about experimentation and depends on ingredients that were available at that period of time, perhaps they did not think to use rice in idlis yet , In India  world war 2 times, under colonial rule with strict control over productiondistribution of grains and rationing ,when imports of Rice from burma was stopped, wheat was rationed to people in towns and villages in Dakshina kannada, most of them had never seen wheat before , not knowing what to do , they processed wheat (soaking steaming ) ,just like they did rice ,making idlis and dosas out of it...

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