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vegetables and fruits in season


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#1 Sushmita

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 01:47 PM

I am a resident of Bangalore. Could I have access to a chart which gives me the names of vegetables and fruits that are in season during the various months? And, are there any vegetables or fruits to be avoided during any season because they are not grown locally and have to be brought from either other parts of India or imported into India?

#2 Suresh Hinduja

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 11:01 AM

Hello Sushmita and welcome to our forums.
As far as I know modern cultivation methods have ensured a year round supply of most vegetables and fruits.
Exceptions being mangoes, litchis, oranges...

Avoid buying imported fruits. I believe there is a concept called food miles- advocating the consumption of agri produce within proximity, thereby saving on transport and carbon emissions.

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#3 jyotirmoy

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 02:33 PM

Yes Suresh bhai is right. These days we get vegetables like Cauliflower, Cabbage, Carrots etc. through out the year where as these once used to be winter vegetables.
That article on Food miles is very much enlightning.

#4 agne

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 09:37 PM

when there is a choice you can choose. but the markets are flooded with australian apples, american corn. it is very hard to find Indian apples or corn to name a few

#5 anil

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 03:55 AM

I am a resident of Bangalore. Could I have access to a chart which gives me the names of vegetables and fruits that are in season during the various months? And, are there any vegetables or fruits to be avoided during any season because they are not grown locally and have to be brought from either other parts of India or imported into India?


Tell me what you cook, what you desire, and I will tell your temptations. Walnuts, almonds, not in BLR, Any big seafood fish is imported, the list depends on what you eat and how you cook it. I would rather look at your daily table and then trace it back to the farm and region.

#6 anil

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 03:58 AM

Exceptions being mangoes, litchis, oranges...

Avoid buying imported fruits.


Last week spotted some Champagne mangos, ripe for the local market. Thanks to Central & South american strain {whatever the right term is. Gautam Da!!!} We see good mangos till mid september in parts of the US.

#7 Sushmita

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 02:43 PM

Thanks for the response!

Given that bulk of our buying is done in supermarkets these days, it is difficult to figure out which of the products are locally grown vs. imported. For instance, is the brocolli available at Namdharis which has a large farm at the outskirts of Bangalore locally grown? Which brings me to my next question...should we as residents of Bangalore be eating brocolli at all? After all, it is a product that does not grow naturally on our soil!
As for fruits, other than bananas, I am quite at a loss about what is grown locally. For apple lovers like me, do we have an option at all to buy Indian apples? What we seem to find is only The South African variety (Dole) or Royal Gala from some other part of the world.

We are a pure vegetarian family who have recently been educated about the concept of 'food miles"; thus the interest to buy and eat local produce for better health.

#8 Suresh Hinduja

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 09:18 AM

Price per kg variations are a good indicator. Produce that has travelled a long way will be expensive.


Consider this:
Imported apples - 95 to 140 per kg
Simla/ Himachal apples - 60 per kg
Indian oranges(when in season) - 35 - 45 per kg
Imported Valencia oranges - 75-90 per kg

Namdharis grow most of the stuff at their farms at Bidadi near Bangalore. Some vegetables and fruits can be grown only in the region near Ooty so that's not too bad.

I do sometimes indulge in the luxury of using 1 Green(USA) apple and add it to a salad.Posted Image

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#9 anil

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 06:50 PM

Thanks for the response!

Given that bulk of our buying is done in supermarkets these days, it is difficult to figure out which of the products are locally grown vs. imported
We are a pure vegetarian family who have recently been educated about the concept of 'food miles"; thus the interest to buy and eat local produce for better health.



Price per kg variations are a good indicator. Produce that has travelled a long way will be expensive.



You have to in the fancy age of supermarts in India, take control of the knowledge of local produce. This is the only way to have a handle on the situation. Food miles while nominally true, sometimes is more efficient than local produce. In our farmer's market the organic apples (NY is an apple growing state) are more expensive than Washington Apples in the supermarket. There are other produce at the formers market which are more expensive to get to retail than for agro businesses by the sheer size of the operations. Certain produce do not scale well, and some produce is not simply available locally. So the options are either change the diet and what you put on the plate, or change buying patterns.

In modern infrastructure and deregulations, spanish tomatoes in Helsinki have more flavor than the greenhouse grown local variety. The problem with food miles is that not all methods of production tend to be efficient and cheaper. We have seen that some of our artisinal breads and jams are about 2-3 times more expensive than the supermarket variety. An artisnal loaf of sourdough bread is about 3.99-4.99(1.2 lb) Vs 2.99-3.49 at the local DAG supermarket.

As long as the local produce is cheaper it will be used in most parts of the world, including US. The case for eco-and-petro-free produce is only appealing to people who can do two things - 1. Afford higher price for the eco consciousness 2. Change drastically their dietary mix of produce and lifestyle.

In a world of hidden subsidies and cross-subsidization of produce, you will find artificial pricing in the markets.

I am sure Gautam Da who also is in New York, but upstate farm county will have a different take on this. Mine is very urban/island centric view.

#10 Termz

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 08:56 PM

As long as the local produce is cheaper it will be used in most parts of the world, including US. The case for eco-and-petro-free produce is only appealing to people who can do two things - 1. Afford higher price for the eco consciousness 2. Change drastically their dietary mix of produce and lifestyle.

In a world of hidden subsidies and cross-subsidization of produce, you will find artificial pricing in the markets.

Well said anil.

Food is our common ground, a universal experience.


#11 Sushmita

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Posted 20 August 2010 - 09:19 AM

I must admit now that I am more confused than I ever was! :)

For a moment, keeping the cost issue aside, can someone educate me on what the health implications (in terms of nutrient value) of eating locally grown produce vs. imported produce is?

#12 nalysale

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 03:22 PM

Hi sushmita its a good question.You need seasonly veg and fruit chart but some veg and fruits are from other countries.so its hard to make a perfect collection.For this you can search on goole,it can help you.