Jump to content
Gourmet India
Gautam

Biryanis and Pulaos

Recommended Posts

Fantastic!

 

Cooked on indirect heat, first few minutes at high and then medium?

 

The onion frying technique is a keeper. :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get up and this is the first thing that I see in the morning. Delicious. It isn't the photos, nor the post , but the expectation of what it would have tasted like based on memory that triggers the delicious!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For fried onions, I normally use a short-cut or a long cut - depends how u see it smile.png

I dehydrate the onions for an hour or so & when I need fried onions I fry them in oil for a minute or so - it browns in a very short time.

Edited by kalc
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

vandy, on 07 Oct 2014 - 08:47 AM, said:

Some good tips in this clip as far as Pulao goes.

 

 

Looks like Suresh has interacted with Nawab Jafar Mir Abdullah during his visit to Luknow, more info >here

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1141123/jsp/calcutta/story_19072533.jsp#.VHKsXIuUeX9

 

 

Yes, Shahanshah Mirza is the great-great-grandson of Wajid Ali Shah, the last nawab of Awadh. Foodlore has it that the nawab came to Calcutta after losing his throne and to cut costs, his cooks replaced the meat with the potato. And, foodlore number two: Wajid Ali Shah’s cooks added the aloo but only after falling on hard times following the death of the nawab. Either way, thus was born the Calcutta biryani the city now gorges on.

The nawab’s family line dismisses all this as, well, lore. “The nawab was a connoisseur of food and had given a free hand to his chefs to experiment with dishes. Once his chefs played around with the biryani and put potatoes in it. The nawab liked it so much that he ordered that the aloo be a constant in the biryani henceforth,” says Shahanshah.

 

and

 

 

How tough it is to serve biryani without the potato in a city weaned on that is evident from what Luknow, an Awadhi food restaurant that opened in Park Circus and Ballygunge this year, had to face. With diners insisting that “aloo chhara biryani hoy na (there can be no biryani without aloo)”, Shalini and Vinay Arora, the couple behind Luknow, were in a pickle. The cooks from Lucknow at the helm said: “Awadhi biryani cannot be cooked with potatoes.” But on popular demand aloo was introduced in one of the 11 biryanis on the menu.
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Mrs went out to dinner with her girlfriends which left me to fend for myself. :rolleyes:

On Friday a friend from work who hails from Hyderabad was kind enough to give a container of some authentic Hyderabadi Dum Biriyani, it was SENSATIONAL, right up there with the best Biriyanis I have had the pleasure of consuming.

So while the wife went to dinner, I had this Biriyani, with Gujarati Choondo Chutney and coriander & chilli pickle.

566cdc5417c4c_HyderabadiDumBiryani001.th

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well - 468 posts and gained a new appreciation for the variety of biryanis and that the "best" one is the one you personally enjoy the most.

468 posts and not a single mention of pressure cooker in preparing a dum biryani.

Not being of Indian descent, the recent purchase of a pressure cooker has started the journey to speed up cooking of dals so far. Incredibly speedy and efficient way to get dal to the plate in no time.

I am sure there is a way to prepare a quick,wonderful tasting, and visually appealing dum using a pressure cooker. Given my preference for meats to be very tender and connective tissue and marrow to be buttery soft, it seems a two stage process can deliver good results.

Very much like the traditional method of mixing the meat, spices, curd, masala, etc. but before adding the rice, one can pressure cook this mixture for the needed time based on the meat. For example, 30 minutes for fairly small chunks of fresh goat. 

Release pressure and add 70% cooked rice along with saffron, colorings and such. Bring back to pressure for maybe 5 more minutes, giving time for rice to finish steaming and colorings/saffron/rose water, etc. to disperse into the rice. 

Release pressure, open top with any desired garnish and server.

Somebody must have some experience or opinion on this approach??

Thanks Don

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Humm.. can not edit my post. 

Slight correction. I did find a few references to pressure cooker in this thread but no actual use with one.

I did find a quote from Gautam -  a pressure cooker [that I try never to use; the greatest killer of flavors invented]

 Is that the general consensus on using pressure cookers? Are you really trading off flavor for speed?

What I have done so far is to fry what I want then add a bit of water and that does a good job of creating a richness of flavors. Once done, if some reduction is  necessary, I'll do that to get the desired thickness of the gravy or dish.

Just curious - what happened to my history? The site thinks I'm a newbie but I've been around off and on since 2008.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×