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vandy

Gulab Jamuns

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vandy    212
Going to try and make some Gulabs this weekend.

Any tips appreciated.


vandy :D

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Chetan    411
Quoting Alka's recipie - [url="http://www.gourmetindia.com/blog/16/entry-120-gulabjamunthe-recipe/"]http://www.gourmetin...amunthe-recipe/[/url]

[quote]

[b][url="http://sindhirasoi.com/2009/09/30/gulabjamun-recipe/sr_gulabjamun-3/"][img]http://sindhirasoi.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/sr_gulabjamun5.jpg[/img][/url] [/b]


This is a Recipe which remained in Drafts for the longest period, the reason being that store brought Gulabjamuns are so convenient to find here and also , these do not cost a bomb. Moreover I find making sweets too unnecessary , since we hardly eat sweet stuff and those in family who love sweets are "barred" from even looking at these, leave aside eating , obviously due to health reasons. But then, I do occasionally give in to the temptation of some appreciation , from the followers of my blog, when I share a particular recipe they keep asking for. Besides, the CLICK event is a huge driving force in itself, so when Jai and Bee asked for Heirloom…here I am with an old cherished Recipe of most cherished Sweet(Mithai) of Indians, with some cherished memories of my childhood(Oh No..Not Again !). Amongst many memories of past , and most of them related to food, one scenario that still lingers around my mind is of a frail, elderly man, always dressed in white, come rain or sunshine, with his aluminum ,wide mouthed container, lined up with stacks of thin, elongated(yes elongated..almost like a finger) hot, perfectly browned, perfectly sweetened , melt in mouth gulabjamuns. Sundays were most cherished days of all, since it used to be a day when whole family sat in front of Television to watch popular serials like Ramayana and Mahabharta, waiting for that elderly man to give a shout "Radhey Ja Garam Jhamuh" roughly translated as Hot Gulabjamuns of Radhey..yes the man was called Radhey ! All the kids around, made sure that they get their share of gulabjamuns and saved their petty pocket money to buy the hot, fresh, straight from the stove(a mobile stove, which burnt on low flame,that kept jamuns hot to the core) each piece costing 25 paise (1/4 of an Indian Rupee…don't ask me to convert into pence /penny/ paiso..go figure it out). So a Rupee used to fetch us four of those yummy sugar bombs , lined on a paper with a dash of sugar syrup. Enjoying those with family watching our favorite Tv. serials(At those times there were only handful of them being aired, that too mostly on Sundays…Ahh what a bliss it was !) was a feeling equivalent to being in Heaven..I swear ! For years we enjoyed his home made gulabjamuns in winter and monsoon, while some really creamy, garnished with pistachios , Kulfi was a Hot (Cool) favorite in summers. Yes , the Gulabjamuns used to give way for Kulfi in summers and till this date we are unable to figure out how did he managed to sale such a good quality stuff in pennies. It was during that wonderful period of my life that visiting maternal side Grandparents was a regular affair in vacations. The memories of spending time with cousins and aunts , uncles and Naana Naani( grandparents) still moisten my eyes , everytime I think about it. My Maasi ( Mother's Sister) always made sure that we kids thoroughly enjoyed our stay at grandparents home, by taking us out to playgrounds, gardens, Beaches, temples, Movies etc. religiously everyday of our stay there, year after year. My Grandparents residing in Chembur, another Sindhi Populated area in Mumbai, the [b]Jhama[/b] Store was at stone throw distance from their home. This particular Sweets shop is famous all around the place for its mindblowing Gulabjamuns, though bit costlier but good to taste at. So no visit of ours would be called off without some of these brown sweets, and everytime someone visits us from Chembur, its almost mandatory that [i][b]Jhama's [/b][/i]Speciality…huge Gulabjamuns are on their way, about to reach our homes to fill our minds with the sweet memories of our childhood as we sweeten our taste buds with huge bites of soft spongy, hot and fresh , the one and only one…Gulabjamun…… UPDATE: Here is what I found about Jhama Stores….thought to share with you all [img]http://sindhirasoi.com/wp-includes/images/smilies/icon_smile.gif[/img]


[i][b]Jhama's >>> Chembur[/b] It gets its name from proprietor Jhamamal Lulla, a Sindhi refugee from Karachi who set it up in 1950. "Our family lived in the refugee camps nearby," says 30 year-old Ravi, a third generation Lulla. His grandfather's culinary skills and reputation for using ingredients of the highest quality, brought him regulars. Close to six decades later, Jhama's has seven branches across the city but the Chembur branch is still patronised by Sindhi families.[/i] [i]Staffer for fifteen years, Naresh Chawla says a lot of movie stars are regulars. [b]Amitabh Bachchan[/b] once named Jhama's Gulab Jamuns in a list of his 7 favourite things. Then there's [b]Salman Khan[/b], who picks up sweets while driving down to his Panvel farmhouse.[/i] [i][b]How to get there:[/b] The wide, red signboard cannot be missed on CG Road, near Chembur colony and Basant Cinema. [b]Open from[/b] 11 am to 1 pm, Mondays to Sundays.(Source: [url="http://www.mid-day.com/whatson/2008/nov/251108-Sindhi-Eateries-Jhamas-B-Bhagat-Tarachand-Shree-Gajanan-Vig-Refreshments-Whats-on-Mumbai.htm"][color="#4e6a97"]Mid-Day[/color][/url] )[/i]
So here they are , soaked in lots of sweet musings , Home made gulabjamuns…Enjoy ! There are number of recipes of Gulabjamun , easily searchable on internet , and as far as the recipe I follow, it is easy breezy one , of course, only if you have some [i]Mawa[/i] handy. The recipe is divided in two parts, one is making BALLS of flour and frying them. The other is making sugar syrup, not too thick nor too thin(sounds tricky, learn more about sugar syrups [url="http://indianfood.about.com/od/techniques/r/sugarsyrup.htm"][color="#4e6a97"]here[/color][/url])
[b]For sugar syrup:[/b] [b]Ingredients:[/b]

[list][*]500 gms of sugar( Though we found it bit too sweet for our taste, so adjust accordingly)[*]One and half cup of water(bit more or less)[*]2-3 Cardamom pods[*]One spoon of milk (optional)[*]Few threads of saffron (optional)[*]2-3 drops of rosewater(optional but highly recommended)[/list][b]Method:[/b] [list][*]Mix about 500 gms of white sugar in one and half cup water and keep it for boiling.[*]Add a spoonful of milk to remove the impurities (impurities if any , will form a scum on surface)[*]Add 2-3 green cardamoms also in syrup for strong flavor, and a tad of saffron strings (optional)[*]Boil until you get just a tad sticky syrup.Gulabjamun syrup is not very dense nor too dilute as in Rasgulla[*]Strain the syrup, add rosewater when syrup is slightly cooled . Always remember two things while using rose water, do not add it while syrup is bubbling hot or on fire, and be particular about the quantity mentioned in every recipe, since even few drops of excess rosewater could lend a bitter taste to the final product.[/list][b]For Gulabjamun:[/b] [b]Ingredients: [/b]

[list][*]250 gms of unsweetened Maawa (khoya-the condensed milk thickened till it turns into moist dough, preferably made from cow's milk, also known as [url="http://http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khoa"][color="#4e6a97"]Hariyali mawa[/color][/url])[*]1 1/2-2 tsp All purpose flour[*]1tsp Cornflour[*]1-2 crushed green cardamom[*]Oil for shallow frying[/list][url="http://sindhirasoi.com/2009/09/30/gulabjamun-recipe/gulabjamun_uncooked/"][img]http://sindhirasoi.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/gulabjamun_uncooked.jpg[/img][/url]
[b]Method:[/b]

[list][*]Mix all the ingredients, in a a wide mixing bowl or [i]Thaal [/i],until soft textured dough is obtained (keep mixing until it is really soft)[*]Make very small sized balls (bit larger than pebbles) coz they swell up after frying and soaking in syrup[*]Make sure that the surface of dough balls is really smooth (no cracks please).In case the cracks refuse to go away, slightly wet your palms with water and roll the flour till absolutely smooth[*]Now take[b] little[/b] oil for frying in preferably flat bottomed pan, and heat the oil. But gulabjamuns are to be fried on [b]LOW FLAME[/b] or else the surface will be browned while the core will remain uncooked. Some prefer to place an unsalted pistachio in the center of every gulabjamun while making balls, that way the core of gulabjamun is not left uncooked .[*]Fry [b]one or 2 gulabjamuns at a time [/b]and always remember to [b]STIR THE OIL [/b]with slotted spoon[b] AND NOT TO TOUCH GULABJAMUNS [/b], which means keep swirling the oil without tossing or turning gulabjamun .[*]Fry till light brown in colour, remove on tissue paper and repeat the procedure with rest of dough[*]Now soak these in [b]COOL syrup [/b]for few hours.They will surely swell up[*]These can be stored in the same syrup till consumed[*]If there are cracks in the balls before frying it will burst open while frying, in that case adding a bit of cornflour will surely help[*]You can enjoy it hot or cold ,either way it is delicious[/list]These are regular Gulabjamuns, in case you like Black Gulabjamuns then here is what you need to know: [b][i]Gulab Jamun gets its brownish red color because of the sugar content in the milk powder or [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khoya"][color="#4e6a97"]khoya[/color][/url]. In other types of gulab jamun, [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar"][color="#4e6a97"]sugar[/color][/url] is added in the dough, and after frying, the sugar [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caramelization"][color="#4e6a97"]caramelization[/color][/url] gives it its dark, almost [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black"][color="#4e6a97"]black[/color][/url] colour, which is then called kala jamun, "black jamun".[/i][/b]
Note: Making mawa from scratch is not difficult but time consuming Four cups of whole milk will boil down to about 6 ounces of mawa milk fudge [b][i](Source..wiki)[/i][/b]
[b][i]For some really helpful videos and tips for alternative way of making gulabjamuns, in case you reside outside India where Khoya is not available, do check out the following links :

[/i][/b]
[color="#4e6a97"]
[color="#4e6a97"][/color][b][url="http://www.gurudwara...aspx?id=350"]http://www.gurudwara...aspx?id=350[/url]




[i][b][/quote][/b][/i][url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPFDtXSEVqA"]
[/url]

[/color][/b]
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vandy    212
Thanks Chetan, I'll let you know how it goes.

That Pic of the cooked Gulab has inspired me.

vandy

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Chetan    411
Go for it vandy , come back with some pictures as well!

Also let us know if you made any modifications to the above recipie for your version !

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Gautam    91
Dear Alkaji & Vandy,

I came across an interesting variant using sooji. I do hope you will both try it so that we can learn from your different experiences opinions of the finished item, compared to your taste memories of the "best":

(not sure about the size of the "cup" measure this lady is using)

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PaUWke_nigE&lr=1[/media]
#1

Does not say full-fat or non-fat milk powder

Very non-standard coffee mugs!! What is a soupspoon in std.measure?

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XIpGkB8P3Y&lr=1[/media]

#2


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TV61ufq1icQ&lr=1

#3

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vandy    212
Yipeeee !!!! Gulab Jamuns turned out absolutely Fantastic.

Thanks for the tips Chetan and looking forward to trying out the sooji Gulab recipe Gautam.

Had to use packet ground cardamom as I had run out of cardamom pods to crush my own cardamom seeds which is the best for flavour by far.

Next time I may add some Almond Meal as well.

I used a packet dough mixture which has turned out perfect.

Couldn't resist, had to have one for breakfast. [img]http://www.gourmetindia.com/public/style_emoticons/default/thumbsu.gif[/img]

vandy [img]http://www.gourmetindia.com/public/style_emoticons/default/wink.gif[/img] Edited by vandy
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Gautam    91
In Bengal, we have the Pantua or Ledikeni [said to be a corruption of Lady Canning, the sweet allegedly being named or created in her honor]. This has a portion of chhana or ricotta cheese and is very spongy & soft. I wonder if Jyotida knows how the proportions. In the same family are the CHHANAR JILIPI, with an even higher proportion of chhana, a torus, and the CHITRAKOOT, a diamond -shaped smooth skinned beauty. The Bengali Kalo Jam has a deep fried hard coat.

The Bengali MALPUA is distinctively different from the north & west Indian. First you need Bengali KHEER which is whole milk, 5.5-6.6% milkfat Australian non-homogenized Jersey reduced very slowly until it caramelizes slightly and thickens to a dense yet pourable fluid. No sugar.

You take this and add white maida which is finer than All purpose flour. Maybe cake flour? How much? Sadly, I can only gauge by eye & hand, seeing this done that way, and you will be able to manage this too. It is rheological logic that explains itself after you try it once. The sad part is that I never make this for myself so am out of practice. It is only made for very special occasions.

You take kheer and just enough flour to bind it to dryish consistency. Then, add warm whole milk to make to make a spoonable batter very much like crepe batter. Add very coarsely pounded black peppercorns, fennel, and the seeds of black cardamom. The peppercorns should be flattened into quarters but their flavors not further dispersed into the batter. You need to bite into the whole spices to release their flavors into your mouth.Their should be the MEREST hint of their aroma around their penumbra but the batter should be quite plain. It is this shocking and delightful contrast that is the art.

The second art is to manipulate the texture from a soft center to a crackly crisp edge. In Kerala, appams are made in a small, deep wok with a characteristic swirl of the hands so that the edges of the appams remain thin and the centre become fat. The same principle applies here with ONE major difference. GHEE.
&
The batter is going tobe poured in such a fashion and in just enough ghee that the edges will thin out & also fry into a crinkly brown crisp curly circle. Just inward, the thinner part will also be crisp but less so, translucent, the embedded spices standing out and cooked to a different degree of toastiness than the ones that were caught at the edges and given a French roast!!

Innermost, at the command & control center of this magical UFO, things remain quite pristine and virginal, for the most part (!!) The whole spices peep demurely from their plump ivory bed and retain a hint of fresh raw edge [ do virgins, I wonder?].

The trick is to retain control of the heat and the quantity/depth of ghee, so that these frying crepe-like discs are able to develop their distinct zonation without scorching or being swamped in fat.

When frying an egg in oil, we can observe the same crinkling, puffing & browning of the margins of the egg white under certain temperatures and depths of oil. The same reactions are taking place with the milk proteins & flour. Therefore, experimenting with a few eggs can help one to understand the general principle of what one is supposed to achieve.

After frying and draining over the hot wok, [reduce heat to stop ghee from oxidizing], place in highot [not scalding] slightly thick simple syrup. Leave at Indian room temperature for a while. In cooler temps., residual ghee might congeal on the syrup. Very gentle warming to 90--100F will melt this. Edited by Gautam
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Chetan    411
[quote]Thanks for the tips Chetan and looking forward to trying out the sooji Gulab recipe Gautam.[/quote]

All thanks to Alka (member - sindhirasoi).

[url="http://www.gourmetindia.com/index.php?app=blog&type=all"]Gourmet India Blog[/url]

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Hi

* Make the dough by combining the milk powder, Bisquick, butter. Add just enough whole milk to make a medium-hard dough. Divide the dough into 18-20 portions. Make balls by gently rolling each portion between your palms into a smooth ball. Place the balls on a plate. Cover with a damp yet dry kitchen towel.
* Heat the oil on high and then lower the heat to medium. Slip in the balls into the hot oil from the side of the pan, one by one. They will sink to the bottom of the pan, but do not try to move them. Instead, gently shake the pan to keep the balls from browning on just one side. After about 5 mins, the balls will rise to the surface. The Gulab Jamuns should rise slowly to the top if the temperature is just right. Now they must be gently and constantly agitated to ensure even browning on all sides.
* If the temperature of the oil is too high then the gulab jamuns will tend to break. So adjust the temperature to ensure that the gulab jamuns do not break or cook too quickly.
* The balls must be fried very slowly under medium temperatures. This will ensure complete cooking from inside and even browning.

Sugar Syrup

* The syrup should be made earlier and kept warm. To make the hot sugar syrup add mix the 2 cups of sugar to 1 cup of water. Add 4-5 cardamom pods, slightly crushed and a few strands of "Kesar". Mix with a spoon and then heat at medium heat for 5-10 minutes until sugar is all dissolved in water. Do not overheat, that will caramelize the sugar.
* Transfer this hot syrup into a serving dish. Keep warm on stove. Add the fried gulab jamuns directly into the warm syrup. Leave gulab jamun balls in sugar syrup overnight for best results. They can be served warm or at room temperature.

Thanks and regards
Saurabh dhawan Edited by saurabh dhawan

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i'll try it this weekend. nice recipe [img]http://www.gourmetindia.com//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] Edited by Suresh Hinduja
external link without permission and one line posts

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